University of California Botanical Garden

Vanessa Handley, University of California Botanical Garden

University of California Botanical Garden (UCBG) has long been engaged in recovery efforts for State and Federally endangered large-flowered fiddleneck, Amsinckia grandiflora. Initially UCBG staff focused on creating a substantial seed bank for the species and, through nursery augmentation of wild-collections, generated a bank of over 100,000 seed (stored along maternal lines). In 2016, a subset of this seed was deployed for a large-scale reintroduction effort at three sites in San Joaquin County, California. The reintroduction was conducted in partnership with Vollmar Natural Lands Consulting (with funding from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) and entailed cultivation and outplanting of over 4000 seedlings. This endeavor - made more challenging by severe terrain and freezing winter rains - resulted in modest persistence in 2017, followed by a banner spring in 2018. UCBG staff and volunteers completed a supplementary round of outplanting this past winter and, by March, all three introduction sites were awash with orange - the Amsinckia grandiflora Super Bloom! This exciting outcome was potentiated by engagement of diverse stakeholders: environmental consultants, multiple agency partners, public and private landowners and UCBG. While the taxon still has a long path to recovery, this preliminary success is a testament to the power of these partnerships. Our recovery implementation strategy will be discussed.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Friday, May 3, 2019

Holly Forbes, University of California Botanical Garden at Berkeley

UC Berkeley has an annual fundraising campaign encouraging donations during a 24-hour extravaganza called the Big Give. Each unit on campus is encouraged to participate by way of incentives (more social media posts by the public, more money provided by campus as a bonus). We focused our outreach for this effort on our popular conservation program. Donations were modest the first year when modest efforts were applied. Staff time and effort were stepped up for the second and third year, resulting in much better return ($40K). These campaigns were seeded ahead of time by established donors and print and social media were heavily utilized to reach potential donors on the day of the Big Give. In addition to financial contributions toward conservation, the Big Give helped us to better publicize our conservation program.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Friday, May 4, 2018