Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden

Cheryl Birker, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden

The California Seed Bank at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden has a germination testing program to monitor the viability of its many conservation seed collections. Germination tests are conducted on all incoming seed collections before they are placed in freezer storage, and for all rare seed collections, follow-up germination tests are conducted periodically in order to monitor their viability throughout the storage term. Germination testing also allows for experimentation with different pretreatments for breaking seed dormancy to inform propagation protocols. Germination tests are conducted on agar and maintained in a temperature controlled germination chamber. Seeds must be treated with a bleach and Tween¨ solution to reduce microbial growth prior to sowing on agar, and this treatment must sometimes be repeated before the test is completed. Germination tests can run anywhere from two weeks to eight months, with weekly monitoring for new germinations and microbial growth. Seedlings are produced as a byproduct of germination testing, which can be transplanted from agar to soil and grown in a nursery for inclusion in a living collection or for second generation seed collecting as an extra means of ex-situ conservation.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Thursday, May 2, 2019
Rancho Santa Ana’s California Seed Bank is home to many of the collections, made by both RSA’s team and collaborating partners.
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Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden

Cheryl Birker, Seed Conservation Program Manager and Evan Meyer, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden

Abies bracteata(Bristlecone fir; Santa Lucia fir) is a 12-30 meter tall tree restricted to a small, wildfire prone range in the Santa Lucia Mountains on the central coast of California. While several botanical gardens maintain living specimens, it remains rare in cultivation and until this project, seeds had yet to be conserved in agermplasmrepository for long-term conservation. In 2014 Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden (RSABG) partnered with the United States Forest Service to seed bankAbies bracteata, but a number of complications postponed the collection, including low cone production, high seed predation, and cone inaccessibility. The populations have been impacted by years of drought as well as by the 2016 Soberanes fire, which also impeded collecting efforts. In 2017, a maternal-line conservation seed collection was made with the help of a tree climber and some unconventional collecting techniques. Seeds are now stored in the RSABG seed bank, with a backup collection at the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation and a living collection in production in the RSABG nursery facility. The lessons learned during this collecting effort will help inform future collections ofAbies bracteatafrom additional populations throughout its range.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Thursday, May 3, 2018