database

Seed bank databases - what do you use?

We have been housing our seed bank and living collections data in Microsoft Access, but are looking to change. Our Horitculture team is interested in IrisBG, but I have no idea how well that would work for housing our seed bank accessions. What are folks using to manage their seed bank databases? I want to implement something that is user friendly and nimble enough to house all of the different types of data we record. We don't have a budget for this at this time, but I'm open to fee-based options if they are much more powerful than free databases.

Question Category: 

How do I document genetic material in my accession database?

What the standards that are typically used? Are there good reference for this type of data storage? What status are typically monitoring (groudn, extracted, sequence)? 

Question Category: 

Dennis Whigham and Julianne McGuinness, North American Orchid Conservation Center

The North American Orchid Conservation Center (NAOCC) was developed by the Smithsonian and the U.S. Botanic Garden to conserve the diversity of native orchids in the U.S. and Canada. NAOCC ecologically-based conservation model has three guiding principles: Preservation through seed and fungal banks, Propagation, Education. NAOCC has a growing network of public and private collaborators working to collect and store seeds of native orchids to further the understanding their ecology, preserve genetic diversity, and provide material for use in research that supports propagation and restoration efforts. NAOCC's collaborative model for orchid conservation is guiding a new project to develop best practices and storage protocols for orchid seeds and their fungal associates. To address the urgent need for evidence-based standardized procedures, NAOCC and a number of its collaborators will study storage practices, conduct germination tests, and develop protocols for each species. Chicago Botanic Garden (CBG) took the lead on a grant application to the IMLS for funding for this project. NAOCC joins CBG, the New England Wild Flower Society, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Atlanta Botanical Garden, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, Illinois College, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Seed Bank, and the Naples Botanical Garden to conduct the first systematic analysis of its kind regarding seed storage practices for North American native orchid species.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Friday, May 4, 2018

David Remucal, University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum

We have been struggling with a propagation database. This has been of particular interest as our orchid conservation program has grown, we have needed a way to track individual maternal sources or populations from seed to potted plant as they go through different treatments and use different media. We began with an excel spreadsheet, but within a couple of years this spreadsheet has become an unwieldy monster. We need to move to a database that can handle our accessions, our inventory, and our propagation efforts, both orchid and non-orchid. We had originally tried to keep the database in-house. To that end, we worked with knowledgeable volunteers to develop an architecture for a database. We are now leaning towards using a pre-built product BUT the process of developing the framework for our own database was extremely informative and useful. It aided us not only in thinking about what we want in a database, but in many other ways, such as how we collect data, how we label our plants, and what we want to say with our data. It was a long process, but I feel we are much better equipped to find the right kind of database for our needs, or adjust the closest product we can find to suit our needs.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Friday, May 4, 2018