Best Practices

Dr. Christina Walters and Lisa Hill, National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, Fort Collins

Because research has shown that seeds will last best when stored at a relative humidity(RH) of 15-25% it is important to understand how the initial RH will respond to temperature changes. In this video, Lisa Hill of the National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation in Fort Collins performs an experiment showing how the relative humidity in seeds changes when moved from room temperature into a freezer. She concludes that for optimal long term storage it is best to dry seeds to around 25% relative humidity before putting them into the freezer.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Johnny Randall, North Carolina Botanic Garden (SePPCon 2016)

Johnny reviews the Center for Plant Conservation best practices related to the link between ex situ and in situ actions. Ex situ collections held as seeds or whole plants can help with research on germination or cultivation and reintroductions to the wild. He discusses clues that may trigger ex situ action, reviews the organizations that help guide the practice, and describes the link to the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation. He reviews patterns of where seed banking is practiced in the world and where it is needed and discusses the continuum of seed types that require different efforts for ex situ conservation. He briefly describes ethics and prioritization for collections, protocols for sampling genetic diversity, and techniques for processing orthodox seeds. Genetic concerns about ex situ collections include genetic drift, adaptation to cultivation, mutation accumulation and artificial selection.  He showcases the NCBG program and accomplishments with partners.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Joyce Maschinski, San Diego Zoo Global and Center for Plant Conservation (SePPCon 2016)

Joyce reviews the ethical considerations guiding our plant conservation professional conduct. Within the CPC, we have found that some actions are widely accepted standards, while others are context-specific and debated. CPC advises that practitioners are mindful of their institutional codes in collection policies or elsewhere. Standards include do no harm, get permission from landowners and agencies, know how to identify the species, and evaluate potential pest, pathogen or invasive behavior of the target species.  Guidelines for the amount to collect, documentation of collection, the kind of material you will be able to collect and conserve, as well as, what can be done with the material is discussed.  For further guidance, Joyce recommends reading CPC publications.

This work was presented at the Southeast Partners in Plant Conservation (SePPCon) 2016 Meeting. Learn more about SePPCon here.

Contributing Author(s): 
Date Recorded: 
Tuesday, November 1, 2016