Genetic Guidelines for Acquiring, Maintaining, and Using a Conservation Collection

  1. The Importance of Genetic Diversity in Collections Joyce Maschinski, Kayri Havens, Jeremie Fant, Andrea Kramer, Pati Vitt, Jennifer Ramp Neale, Edward O. Guerrant, Jr., Christine Edwards, and Stephanie Steele
  2. Genetic Guidelines for Acquiring a Conservation Collection: Joyce Maschinski, Christina Walters, Sheila Murray, Kayri Havens, Jeremie Fant, Andrea Kramer, Pati Vitt, Jennifer Ramp Neale, Edward O. Guerrant, Jr., Christine Edwards, and Stephanie Steele
  3. Genetic Guidelines for Maintaining a Conservation Collection: Joyce Maschinski, Kayri Havens, Jeremie Fant, Andrea Kramer, Pati Vitt, Jennifer Ramp Neale, Edward O. Guerrant, Jr., Christine Edwards, and Stephanie Steele
  4. Genetic Guidelines for Using Portions of the Conservation Collection for Reintroductions and Other Purposes: Joyce Maschinski, Kayri Havens, Jeremie Fant, Andrea Kramer, Pati Vitt, Jennifer Ramp Neale, Edward O. Guerrant, Jr., Christine Edwards, and Stephanie Steele

Overview

Genetic Considerations for Plant Conservation

Part 3 provides guidance for maximizing genetic diversity when collecting, maintaining, and reintroducing rare plant species to the wild.

Overview

Genetic Considerations for Plant Conservation

Part 3 provides guidance for maximizing genetic diversity when collecting, maintaining, and reintroducing rare plant species to the wild.

ACQUIRING THE PLANT MATERIAL

Prior to Collection

  • Review species’ population sizes, locations & biology, previous genetic studies & taxonomy.

While Collecting

  • Capture diversity intentionally.
  • Collect from 50 plants and up to 3000 seeds.
  • Collect 5 populations or more across the existing diversity.
  • Maintain maternal lines separately.
  • Collect no more than 10% of seed crop in any year and no more than 5 out of 10 years.

Extremely Threatened Populations

  • Collect from all populations.

MAINTAINING THE MATERIAL

Minimize Artificial SelectionGenetic Drift and Hybridization

  • Maintain all the diversity. Avoid favoring large seeds or vigorous plants.
  • Maintain maternal lines separately.
  • Allow time for all seeds to germinate.
  • Monitor collection health and diversity.
  • Limit the number of generations in cultivation

USING THE MATERIAL

Reintroductions and Conservation Translocations

  • Use at least 50 plants or 1000 seeds, or as many as is feasible.
  • Maintain even family lines.
  • Plan appropriate source material for recipient site.
  • Use a single source unless there is compelling reason to mix populations.
  • Mix sources (or consider genetic rescue) if inbreeding, declines in vigor, or reproduction occur in the source wild population or the if existing populations are small (<100), have no chromosomal differences, no distinct ecological differences, and have been separated less than 500 years.

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Suggested Citation

Center for Plant Conservation. Genetic Guidelines for Acquiring, Maintaining, and Using a Conservation Collection in CPC Best Plant Conservation Practices to Support Species Survival in the Wild. Web Version. https://plantnucleus.com/best-practices/genetic-guidelines-acquiring-maintaining-and-using-conservation-collection Accessed: 12/11/2019 - 12:28pm